What is the fastest sail-propelled watercraft

German speed kitesurfing record

And Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record for Germany - Record of all classes and all sails

 

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Wolfram Reiners - at the start of the high-speed canal in Lüderitz at the 2011 Lüderitz Speed ​​Challenge.

 

 

Video of the record run:

On Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/37583544

On YouTube: http://youtu.be/fdo_4msBb3A

Wolfram Reiners - German Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record.

 

 

 

NEW GERMAN SPEED RECORD FOR SAILING VEHICLES SET BY WOLFRAM REINERS AT THE 2011 LÜDERITZ SPEED CHALLENGE

 

New German speed kitesurfing record and outright speed sailing record

 

November 4, 2011.
Luderitz, Namibia. The kiteboarder Wolfram Reiners drove a new German speed record for kitesurfers this week and at the same time secured the German record for all classes under sail, the Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record. He drove his kiteboard over the ultimate distance of 500 meters at an average speed of 46.26 knots, that is 85.67 km / h. A German sailing vehicle has never been faster.

 

Speed ​​records under sail are monitored by the World Sailing Speed ​​Record Council (WSSRC) under strict conditions. The new record has been ratified by the WSSRC. Ratifications will only be given after all national bodies have had the opportunity to review the measurement. Wolfram Reiners, from Wangen im Allgäu, set the new record on a lagoon near Lüderitz in Namibia as part of the 2011 Lüderitz Speed ​​Challenge. The temperature differences between the cool water of the Atlantic and the hot Namib Desert make for notoriously strong winds there. The record was set at wind speeds between 32 and 41 knots (60-75 km / h). His top speed in the record run was close to 50 knots (over 92 km / h).

 

For around 40 years, high-speed sailboats, windsurfers and kite surfers have been struggling to achieve speed records without stored energy and only with wind power. The USA, France and Australia dominate this sport and it is not only about a lot of fame, but also about the impressive demonstration of highly developed, technical innovations in sailing. The top speeds achieved also prove the top performance that can be achieved with renewable energies and wind power. In 2008, kitesurfers broke the magic limit of 50 knots (over 92 km / h), which was previously considered a magical limit, for the first time in history, and last year they set a new world record above 55 knots, which is probably very difficult for boats and windsurfers to achieve, which corresponds to over 100 km / h. Since then, kite surfers have been the fastest watercraft without a combustion engine.

 

The new German record for all classes was also set by Wolfram Reiners with a kitesurfer. His speed would have been enough in 2007 to set the world record for kitesurfers. It exceeded the previous German record in all classes by almost 4 knots (2007 Dirk Hanel with 42.44 knots). Reiners lives and trains in Cape Town, South Africa. It's not the first time Reiners has hit the headlines. In 2003 the inventor and entrepreneur from information technology was appointed to the first e-business chair in Germany as a professor and in 2007 was awarded the coveted European ICT Prize of the European Union for his innovations in mobile technologies. In 2008 he switched from science and business to professional sport as a speed kiteboarder.

 

"I am very happy and proud of my German record in all classes," said Dr. Wolfram Reiners. "It has always been my dream to achieve the highest levels of success in all three areas of science, business and sport. I have made this dream come true. The key is a clear vision of what you want to achieve in your life. And then focused work and training, to arrive at your destination at some point. Don't be confused by what others say, but stay true to your dream, follow it with a clear view and make it come true. "

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiteboarding Magazine 12/2011

 

KITE Magazine 1/2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wolfram Reiners

- after setting the new German record in speed kitesurfing and the outright speed sailing record for Germany.
Sponsor: KITEKAHUNAS - Advanced Kitesurfing School - Cape Town - South Africa.
KITEKAHUNAS offer freeride / freestyle courses and kite wave riding courses. Also for beginners who really want to learn kitesurfing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) BACKGROUND TO THE OUTRIGHT SPEED SAILING RECORD
(Record speed of all classes of watercraft under sail)

Speed ​​records have always fascinated people. Speed ​​records under natural conditions, such as a 100 meter sprint or from boats under sails, are of particular importance. Reaching high speeds without an internal combustion engine and any other type of stored energy is not all difficult. It is also trend-setting, as it is about the utilization of "green", renewable and completely environmentally friendly energies and drives the technical development in this area. Among the green energies, only wind power has so far achieved top results, used with sailing vehicles.

In order to regulate the many decades-long struggle for speed records by sailing vehicles, the World Sailing Speed ​​Record Council (WSSRC) took over the regulations in 1972, as well as the supervision and documentation of all record attempts. Records must be officially ratified by the WSSRC. Strict conditions apply and record attempts are generally monitored by the WSSRC. There are a large number of distances and classes of sailing vehicles in which official records can be achieved, for example sailing boats with various square meters of sails, windsurfers or kitesurfers. The ultimate distance is 500 meters. The WSSRC calls the record of all classes the Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record - the fastest watercraft ever under sail.

 

2) HISTORY OF THE OUTRIGHT SPEED SAILING RECORD

The Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record was held by sailboats of various types until the 1980s. In 1985 a windsurfer took this record for the first time. Since then, a fierce battle has broken out between the high-speed boats of different nations and the little windsurfers. The record boats are the result of multi-million dollar projects in major sailing nations, comparable to Formula 1 motor racing, and they are equipped with all the technical refinements. The windsurfers, on the other hand, get by on a comparatively low budget and few team members go on a record hunt with prototype materials. In 1992 a crew from Australia brought back the honor of racing sailboats, if only for a short time. In 2008, the American kitesurfer Rob Douglas ended the era of windsurfers as the fastest, wind-powered watercraft. He drove in the newly discovered Lüderitz district in Namibia, in the middle of the desert with super strong winds, close to 50 knots. To date, this magical limit has been unsuccessfully attacked by various watercraft in countless record attempts over many decades and the 50 knots have long been considered inaccessible. A little later, however, in the same year, the Frenchman Sebastien Cattelan broke this limit over the 500 meter distance for the first time with a kiteboard. This filled many windsurfers with resignation and the fate of the boats at the top of the world seemed sealed forever. But maintaining the honor of the high-budget boating industry motivated huge efforts. In fact, in 2009, the French-flagged hydrofoil trimaran Hydroptère brought back the world record of all classes for the boats and drove over 51 knots. And again it was on the lagoon near Lüderitz in 2010 that the kite surfers were able to hit back by reaching 100 km / h for the first time and then even 55 knots.

In the past 40 years, high-speed sailing has developed into an internationally competitive and interdisciplinary sport with a high level of public interest. High technical developments and the courage of the athletes dominate here like in hardly any other sport. The extreme contrasts in the development budget are just as fascinating. Self-financed individualists with a lot of dedication stand up to giants with budgets of millions.

 

 

Outright World Records

1975

31.80

Boat Crossbow

Tim Coleman

Weymouth, UK

1977

34.40

Boat - Crossbow

Tim Coleman

Weymouth, UK

1979

36.00

Boat - Crossbow

Tim Coleman

Weymouth, UK

1985

38.66

Windsurfer

Pascal Maka

Fuerteventura, Canaria, SPAIN

1987

40.48

Windsurfer

Erik Beale

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

1989

42.91

Windsurfer

Pascal Maka

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

1990

43.06

Windsurfer

Thierry Bielak

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

1991

44.66

Windsurfer

Thierry Bielak

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

1992

46.52

Boat - Yellow Pages Endeavor

Simon McKeon

Sandy Point, AUSTRALIA

2003

46.82

Windsurfer

Finian Maynard

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

2004

48.70

Windsurfer

Finian Maynard

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

2008

49.09

Windsurfer

Antoine Albeau

Sainte Marie de la Mer, FRANCE

2008

49.84

Kite surfers

Robert Douglas

Luderitz, NAMIBIA

2008

50.52

Kite surfers

Sebastien Cattelan

Luderitz, NAMIBIA

2008

50.57

Kite surfers

Alexandre Caizergues

Luderitz, NAMIBIA

2009

50.98

Kite surfers

Alexandre Caizergues

Luderitz, NAMIBIA

2009

51.36

Hydroptere

Alain Thebault

Hyeres, FRANCE

2010

55.49

Kite surfers

Sebastien
Cattelan

Luderitz, NAMIBIA

2010

55.65

Kite surfers

Robert Douglas

Luderitz, NAMIBIA

 

 

3) 2011 LÜDERITZ SPEED CHALLENGE - DESCRIPTION OF THE EVENT

When kite surfers exceeded the legendary 50 knots mark, which had long been considered unattainable, in 2008, this initially sparked the discussion within the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) as to whether kite surfers could even be counted as sailing vehicles. As the main argument, opponents of the kite surfers cited the shallow water in which kiteboards can navigate. It was argued that there would be a ground effect, similar to flying directly above the surface of the earth, which kitesurfers take advantage of. Boats do not enjoy this advantage because of the higher draft and windsurfers because of the longer fins. Since 2009, a canal has therefore been dug on the shoreline of the lagoon in Lüderitz to ensure sufficient water depth. However, this caused the problem that records were only possible within two to three hours a month, because the competition and record conditions were not only dependent on the wind, but also on the tide. The highest speeds were only possible in strong winds and at the same time when the tide was low. So the idea of ​​an inland canal was born for the record attempts at the 2011 Lüderitz Speed ​​Challenge. This offers sufficient water depth while at the same time being independent of the tides, as the channel always remains filled with water.

Several record attempts are on the program of the event. Sebastien Cattelan has set himself the goal of setting the new Outright Speed ​​Sailing world record. The French Sophie Routaboul tries the same record for women. The National Outright Speed ​​Sailing Records of South Africa (Basil Cambanis defends the record against Taro Niehaus) and Namibia (Stefan Metzger) are under attack. Anders Bringdal, four-time world champion in windsurfing, is trying his hand at the world record for windsurfers and wants to surpass the 50 knots for windsurfers for the first time. On October 31st he set the Swedish Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record with just over 47 knots. Wolfram Reiners starts for Germany and on the same day he achieved a new German record for speed kitesurfing and at the same time the Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record for Germany (46.26 knots or 85.67 km / h over 500 meters).

 

4) THE GERMAN OUTRIGHT SPEED SAILING RECORD

For Germany, the National Outright Speed ​​Sailing Record was set up in 1995 by windsurfer Jochen Krauth with 41.90 knots over 500m in Fuerteventura. In 2007 Dirk Hanel surpassed him with a kiteboard with 42.44 knots in Lüderitz, Namibia. Wolfram Reiners set the new record for all sailing vessels flying the German flag on October 31, 2011 in Lüderitz, Namibia with 46.26 knots. The record was set on a kiteboard and was ratified by the World Sailing Speed ​​Record Council (WSSRC).

How is this German performance to be assessed? By 2007, speeds of 46 knots were good enough to hit the world record in speed kitesurfing. The fastest kite surfer in the world, Alexandre Caizergues set the world record in 2007 with 44.77 knots and a little later that same year Sebastien Cattelan surpassed him with 46.71. Four years ago that was a new world record.

 

5) WOLFRAM REINERS

Wolfram Reiners (44) comes from the Allgäu. He initially made a successful career as an inventor and entrepreneur in business and as a professor in science. A few years ago he switched to professional sport as a kite surfer. He fulfilled his dream and in 2011 drove the German speed record of all classes for sailing vehicles.

For five months a year, during his childhood and youth, skiing in the ideal mountain world on the northern edge of the Alps was on the agenda every day. His favorite disciplines were downhill skiing and ski jumping. This is where his love for outdoor sports and his inclination for high speeds was born. He studied psychology with an emphasis on research methods, mathematics and the application of psychological knowledge in business. In 1996 he received a doctorate in philosophy. His research on human judgment and decision-making processes required complex mathematical models and the development of scientific software. That's how he came to information technology. After completing his doctorate, Wolf remained loyal to information technology as a management consultant in Germany, the USA, the UK and, from 1998, in South Africa. Since then he has been working on innovations for the Internet and for mobile technologies. As an entrepreneur, he implemented his own inventions and patents. In 2003 Wolf was appointed to the first chair in Germany for e-business systems as a professor and he returned to Germany for a few years. This was followed in 2007 by the European Union's European ICT Prize, the world's most important prize for innovations in information and communication technology, and other awards such as the prize for the humane use of information technology. "My goal has always been to create meaningful innovations for the benefit of people," is how he sums up what drove him on a daily basis.

During this time Wolf discovered his passion for kiteboarding. Back in South Africa, he suffered a ruptured cruciate ligament and meniscus in a kitesurfing accident. His knee injury no longer allowed him to spend the entire day at his desk and in meetings. "A damaged knee requires daily sport and so I decided to take up professional sport late. Just as I was on skis every day in my youth, from now on I went to the water every day to train. In Cape Town, often with dolphins, Seals and whales as spectators. " This is what a career change sounds like at Wolf.

In speed kiteboarding, Wolf flies a Genetrix Hydra, a flat-shaped kite by the designer Martial Camblong with a lot of depower, with which you can master the highest wind speeds with hard gusts. The 9m kite allows him a lot of power in an extremely high wind range. His board is a Xelerator Speed ​​Board, 154 cm, specially built by shaper Fred Kloren for the race track in Lüderitz. He is the fastest sailor in Germany. He achieved his German Outright Speed ​​Sailing record of 46.26 knots over 500m in 32 knots of wind with gusts of up to 41 knots. His top speed on this run was just under 50 knots.

Wolf lives and trains in Cape Town, South Africa. The analysis of his training accident in 2008 showed that due to the lack of training opportunities after the beginners' course, many kite surfers learn wrong movement sequences, do not recognize dangers with certainty, progress only slowly and many kiters injure themselves through trial and error. He founded an advanced kitesurfing school on Sunset Beach in Cape Town, with courses for freeride / freestyle and wave kitesurfing to close this training deficit. "You learn faster, better and safer under supervision" is his motto.

"I am very happy and proud of my German record," said Dr. Wolfram Reiners. "It has always been my dream to achieve the highest level of success in all three areas of science, business and sport. I have made this dream come true. The key is a clear vision of what you want to achieve in your life. And then focused work and training, to arrive at your destination at some point. Don't be confused by what others say, but stay true to your dream, follow it with a clear view and make it come true. "

 

 

6) MEANING OF SPEED SAILING

That is typical for Wolfram Reiners. He's not just the best speed kitesurfer and high-speed sailor in Germany. No, he also has a philosophical explanation as to why he practices this extreme sport. The former professor, multiple inventor and entrepreneur motivates himself for daily training with the fact that the extreme speeds on the water of 80 to 100 km / h are only possible with green energy, with wind power, without any environmental pollution.Anyone who has ever sat in a water ski motor boat with several hundred horsepower knows how fast and dizzying even 50 km / h feels on the water. "We are almost twice as fast with our kiteboards, and that silently and without a combustion engine. That is precision, top speed, action and power driven exclusively by wind power, which ultimately comes from the sun." says Wolf, professional kitesurfer and entrepreneur with a scientific background. "Our chase for records stimulates so many ideas and technical developments for the use of renewable energies. We prove that you do not necessarily have to burn gasoline and coal if you know how to skillfully use the daily renewing natural forces of nature with good technology." Inventor has Dr. Reiners learned that all technical innovations for overcoming problems often seem impossible at first glance. "But if you believe that there has to be a solution and just stick with it, then you will finally find the technical solution. 30 years ago no one believed that sailing vessels would ever be able to travel at speeds of over 40 knots or even 50 knots Last year the best kite surfers in the world still reached the 55 knot mark. They believed in the possibility and put all their money into training and material development every day and finally proved that even impossible goals can be achieved. "